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Second Place-Same Source
L.A. Photo Curator: International Photography Awards - 'Where Photography & Philanthropy Meet' Second Place-Same Source (Click on image for larger view)
Objects of Ruin, XLII by SameSource
(Click on image for larger view)

Same Source says of this work, 'Objects of Ruin', "Is female beauty disposable?

By juxtaposing discarded female beauty with discarded ruins of civilization, Objects of Ruin satirizes the notion that human sexuality, in particular when expressed in the form of female nudity, objectifies all of us and leads us on a path to ruin. 

It is my hope that the viewer will be challenged to reconsider notions of objectification and female nudity wrapped in metaphor, while also experiencing an aesthetically engaging exploration of the ruins of society and a sometimes farcical and sometimes direct confrontation with the potentially disturbing beauty in death and destruction.

Sexual imagery is all around us.  When it is seemingly subtle, like a suggestive flower in a Georgia O’Keeffe painting, it garners praise for sophistication.  When it is overt, as in actual nudity or copulation, it is often shunned or criticized for arguably debasing those represented.  Once it becomes ubiquitous, like the feminine shape of a Coca-Cola bottle, we hardly notice the representation or consider it for what it is. 

It’s not politically correct to acknowledge it, but sexual images of women are far more popular than those of men in our culture. 

This is true whether you are talking about fashion magazines marketed to women or sports magazines marketed to men. 

There’s no denying that the female form has played a major role in Western Art as well as in other cultures, and today the fine art world continues to struggle with the notion that portrayal of the basic human condition of arousal and associated eroticism (often dismissed as obscene) conflicts with the “more pure” pursuits of physical geometry and political commentary about sexuality (the latter group being more readily labeled as “art” by those empowered to make that call). 

As a photographic artist, I’m interested in pursuing the uncomfortable ground where these two worlds inevitably must overlap."

SameSource is a photographic artist with over two decades of professional experience recording images. 

SameSource fine art photography spans both landscape and bodyscape, often exploring human sexuality and its relationship with art. 

With recent showings from the Musée du Louvre, Paris, France, to Art Basel, Miami Beach, SameSource is becoming an established international presence. 

SameSource was recently recognized with an Honorable Mention in the international Lumiere Award for 2016. 

Coagula Gallery in Los Angeles has included SameSource in its Ten Top Artists exhibition for 2016 in a show curated by Tulsa Kinney of Artillery Magazine

SameSource work has been featured in The Huffington Post and American Photo magazine in connection with the Round Hole, Square Peg, exhibition at Artists Corner Gallery in Los Angeles. 

SameSource work has twice been selected (2013, 2016) among the 12 best photos of the year in the prestigious 12” of Sin International Art Exhibition with extended runs at Sin City Gallery in Las Vegas. 

Works from SameSource’s Apples series have twice been award winners in YDP contests held by renowned Duncan Miller Gallery.
 
SameSource has origins in the rural Midwest. After studying music and philosophy in a liberal arts education, the artist went to Italy and became immersed in the works of the Renaissance. A return to the US brought the pursuit of graduate work in music and cinema, with an eventual arrival on the west coast via the USC film school. In addition to the full-time pursuit of photographic fine art, SameSource output has included notable works as a recording artist, writer, and filmmaker.

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